Relentless Safety

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Don’t get squeamish yet, I won’t start there Monday was my first morning gym session after a couple months of sporadic workouts after work. Most of my inconsistency was due to my own lack of motivation but kicked into high gear when my workout partner, Kevin (first mentioned in THIS POST), transitioned to night shift. As a result, both of us went on a bit of a hiatus. That isn’t really that… Read More

And risk will never not be risky… A few years ago I was reading through some training slide decks for R&D (rip-off and duplicate) purposes. A HUGE, bold statement caught my eye and dropped my jaw. The statement was beyond asinine at first blush, but I wanted to test my opinion. So, I texted my friend Rich (who you may recall is much taller and MUCH older than I am). I saved… Read More

Or are you getting distracted? I was recently invited to do a podcast with John Chapman on his Blue Collar Voices show. Check it out if you haven’t yet. It was a great conversation. John caught me off guard at one point, though, when he asked me if my experience and training made me constantly notice all of the hazards around me. I had to think about my answer for a minute,… Read More

Everything is actually In late 2016 I had just passed all of the lab work required to obtain a new life insurance policy. My numbers were perfect and I was in great shape. I was less than a year past my unsatisfying attempt at competitive bodybuilding. And while I had given up on that dream, I hadn’t given up on the training and discipline of the craft. On November 16th, I woke… Read More

I’m just going to come right out say it. This subject straight pisses me off. When we go around talking about how awesome our companies are at safety because we’ve got low incident rates it equates to pissing on the grave of every worker who has died at our facilities. There is no correlation and the games we play to get “good” are just disgusting. Interpreting the grey areas in CFR 1904… Read More

We’ve got to get better at “racking and stacking” our risks.

If someone doesn’t value their limbs staying attached to their bodies, no raffle for a low-end 32″ TV will change that. Instead of dangling useless carrots, we should invest time and energy in knowledge and empowerment.

It really is a shame that we jump to legal ramifications before we even try to make plans to keep people safe.

Experience is a powerful teacher. But it can also be a catalyst for complacency for those using it to teach. Next time you’re in a position to convey your experience to someone else, be sure you don’t fall into the trap of believing that person will understand what you’re teaching in the same way you do.

It’s easy to pinpoint poor behaviors and blame the actions someone takes after an incident occurs. But, it becomes much harder to do when you have to look in the mirror and admit that you made the same error in judgment as the person who “caused” an event.

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